Richard Peters, on a Back Garden Safari

Richard Peters, on a Back Garden Safari

Posted by on Nov 17, 2015 in Blog, Inspiration | 0 comments

Richard Peters is a professional wildlife photographer from the UK with a style that often takes a priority of light, over subject. During the last year however, he has begun working with camera traps, concentrating on a location he has a personal connection with, his back garden! This project not only spawned a compressive ebook, designed to help others improve their photography, but also resulted in him winning the Urban category of Wildlife Photographer of the Year, as well as being named the European Wildlife Photographer of the Year in 2015. What inspired you to do a project in your garden? As I’ve grown as a photographer over the years, I’ve become more and more obsessed with the idea of photographing unfamiliar subjects. Social media is partly to blame, because everyday I look on my various timelines and see photographers posting beautiful imagery from all over the world. In recent times there have been a number of photographers in the UK doing some beautiful work with more local urban wildlife, but it wasn’t until I saw a fox walking through my garden, that I felt inspired to work close to home and try it for myself. For several months I lay at my kitchen door each night waiting for them to visit at dusk. In all that time I only managed to capture one usable image, but regardless I loved being able to work at home. Not long after I got that one image, they started only visiting once it was dark, making traditional photography impossible. However it was during those early days that I started to see the bigger picture that it would be good to inspire others into seeing the familiar with a fresh perspective – to show that you can take beautiful wildlife images anywhere there is wildlife. So using a camera trap was a natural progression? It was natural in that it was the only way I could continue to photograph the foxes, but the move from traditional photography to camera trapping wasn’t entirely smooth. I purchased a trail camera to monitor nighttime activity and very quickly discovered a badger was also visiting my garden. This led me to start experimenting with using flash, which I had no experience of at all. It was a slow process figuring out how to light the world at night to best effect, and I was also using a remote shutter release to trigger the camera for the first couple of months. This led me into a routine of sitting in my kitchen in complete darkness, with a torch shining out the door so I could see when any potential animals would walk in range of my lens. Despite working from the comfort of home, it was a very frustrating and tiring time as I found myself becoming addicted to waiting each night for a photo opportunity. But with...

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