New Wireless Triggers

New Wireless Triggers

Posted by on Apr 30, 2015 in Blog, News | 0 comments

New Camtraptions Wireless Triggers have now been added to the store. These are an easy way to remotely fire your camera, or trigger multiple off-camera flashes. The triggers are suitable for use in camera traps as they wake flashes when the camera powers up (*see note below) so that they fire at the first shot. They also work with both Canon and Nikon cameras and flashes, so you can use a Canon camera to wake and trigger Nikon flashes without any additional adapter. Standby time of the receiver unit on a fresh set of batteries is around 200 hours. You can find out more here: Wireless Triggers *Note: One or two cameras, such as the Canon EOS 1D X, have been found to power up and fire off the first shot so quickly that the flashes do not wake up in time. If you need your flashes to fire at the first shot, please contact us to check your camera is...

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Sebastian Kennerknecht: Tracking Down the World’s Wild Cats

Sebastian Kennerknecht: Tracking Down the World’s Wild Cats

Posted by on Apr 21, 2015 in Blog, Inspiration | 0 comments

Sebastian Kennerknecht is a wildlife and conservation photographer based in Santa Cruz, California. He focuses much of his photography on wild cats and the threats they face. Being totally wild cat obsessed, it’s important to him to play a role in their survival. Though the threats are often easy to photograph, many times, the actual cats are not. This has led him to use camera traps extensively to try and get pictures of these amazing, but elusive animals. He has now photographed a quarter of the world’s wild cat species and is currently working on photographing the Andean Mountain Cat as part of the Cat in Thin Air project. What inspired you to get involved with remote photography work? I have always had an obsession with wild cats and though some species can be seen on a semi-regular basis (I love tracking and interacting with wild Bobcats), most species are incredibly hard to encounter. Because I live in California, I always wanted to get a photograph of a wild mountain lion. It didn’t take too long until I realized I needed camera traps to make that a reality. Besides getting pictures of species nearly impossible to see, it also became quite apparent to me that camera traps provided amazing creative possibilities. Researching and seeing the amazing tiger pictures of Michael “Nick” Nichols, the snow leopard pictures from Steve Winter, and the bat pictures from Michael Durham were truly eye opening experiences. You’ve worked on a number of species in various locations around the world, what was the first commissioned job that you opted to use this technique for and was it a big learning curve? My first assignment in which I used camera traps was trying to get a photograph of an Arabian Leopard photograph in Yemen. (I failed, never getting a picture of the leopard, which hasn’t been photographed in the country since three months before my arrival in 2010… a sad fact). I think everyone who has built their own camera trap can attest to the fact that in doing so is taking the path of insanity. Even though I had seen National Geographic’s camera traps while working for Frans Lanting, I didn’t have an interest in camera traps at the time and missed the opportunity to see how the magazine’s engineers made it work. That subsequently meant that it took me a whole year to construct one camera trap set-up working to the level I expected it to. I ended up taking four camera traps to Yemen, and I quickly realized there were a ton more things to learn. On the equipment side I had to learn things like protecting the cables from getting chewed on by rodents and keeping the moisture out of the different housings. My camera trap design has definitely changed since that first trip. What was your biggest challenge when working in Yemen photographing...

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Philip Briggs Interview

Philip Briggs Interview

Posted by on Apr 8, 2015 in Blog, Inspiration | 0 comments

Philip was born in Kenya and spent his childhood years living in extremely remote areas, spending much of his time exploring the African bush. These early experiences gave him a great love of wild places and nature, which later developed into a desire to capture what he witnesses in the wild through creative photography, in a way that would not only reveal the wonders of nature, but also employ his artistic flair. What inspired you to get involved with remote photography work? While I was photographing in National Parks and Reserves in Kenya in 2008, I was becoming increasingly frustrated with being restricted to designated roads and attempting to capture wildlife from large distances. I wanted to be able to create a different perspective in my images as there were many other photographers that I saw, day in and day out, attempting to shoot the same scenes, side by side. I felt that I had to diversify and add a different dimension to my images. At that point, I was inspired by Anup Shah’s low level photography in unusual locations and aspired to create my own images with a similar unique twist. One day I finally took the plunge and brought a simple hand-drawn sketch to a local carpenter to make an 8ft plank of wood with a base fixed on one end where I strapped the camera. This was then hoisted out of my 4×4 vehicle and placed onto the ground whilst I held onto the plank from inside the car. This gave me great versatility but meant that the animals always had to come to me. In the coming years I developed boxes which I would place in appropriate places and fire with a remote shutter release from a distance. My initial setup was simple but worked like a charm. Although it needed more protection for the camera. These are my first attempts. What do you specifically find are the advantages of using these techniques? Obviously getting close to your subject usually improves the image quality and gives better depth to the environment. But the greatest advantage that I see from this approach is that you are immediately propelled into the animal’s world. It’s amazing how quickly the characters of each animal are immediately exposed and this comes across in the images. What are the disadvantages? The biggest disadvantage for this type of technique is that the situation doesn’t always allow for a camera to be placed out on the ground, maybe due to terrain issues such as rocks and long grass. My camera set-ups over the years have never had wheels, so lack of mobility has been a major drawback. It can also be intrusive on the animals if not used wisely. From a technical perspective on location, what are the greatest challenges you have had to overcome? Anticipating what might happen in a scene in...

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