Jamie Hall – British Wildlife

Jamie Hall – British Wildlife

Posted by on Dec 23, 2014 in Blog, Inspiration | 0 comments

The latest in our series of trap and remote camera wildlife photographer interviews brings us UK based photographer Jamie Hall. Jamie’s extensive field-craft skills have stemmed from a love of nature that developed at a young age, and he uses this knowledge to seek out elusive and shy species in order to capture images. Although only picking up a camera relatively recently in 2010, he quickly began building a portfolio of impressive and unique images, resulting in him taking up the occupation full time at the end of 2012. Jamie’s reputation has been built around a more novel approach to photographing familiar UK subjects, and this has gained him numerous awards and recognition including 4 years running in the British Wildlife Photography Awards, BBC Wildlife Magazine Camera Trap competition winner for the last 2 years and recently, being approached by Canon UK to help promote some of their latest equipment for low light photography. What inspired you to get involved with camera trap work? It was the work of a couple of other photographers, namely Steve Winter with his image of a tiger up to its shoulders in a crevice filled with water and drinking, and that more recently of Charlie Hamilton James and the camera trap work he was producing of the otters on the stream outside of his home. Both photographers were using this technique to produce ‘new’ images of mammals that we are all familiar with, and pushing boundaries and ideas, and in Steve’s case highlighting the plight of a critically endangered creature. You have to remember that the concept of camera trapping with an SLR camera was really only used by research teams studying animal movements and behaviour (sometimes even discovering new species) in foreign countries, so to see these fresh images was a big pull for me. We live on a small, over populated, island where everyone who owns a camera seems to be a photographer now, so it’s very difficult to produce images that are new to the eye. I was also fed up of seeing the same images from the same places, of the same animals, where the photographer just sits behind a 500mm lens and opens fire will all their available frames per second. Granted we all enjoy different aspects of our photography but, for me it’s about being able to do something different to everyone else. What do you specifically find are the advantages of using these techniques? One of the main advantages and probably the most obvious is that you don’t need to be there to take an image. It’s unobtrusive to the subject, which is great as it seems all too often we see animals being hounded by photographers, especially in recent times. Also, it allows you to get images of your subject displaying normal behaviour, non manipulated and going about its daily life the way you would...

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Connor Stefanison – Camera trapping in British Columbia

Connor Stefanison – Camera trapping in British Columbia

Posted by on Dec 15, 2014 in Blog, Inspiration | 0 comments

Camera trap photography isn’t new, but it’s certainly gaining in popularity. Here at Camtraptions we want to promote this creative and often challenging form of photography by interviewing those making headway with camera trap systems. Our first such photographer is Connor Stefanison. Living on the Pacific coast in British Columbia, Canada, Connor has learned about wildlife and wilderness firsthand. His photography draws from knowledge gained throughout his life pursuing outdoor activities such as fishing, hunting, wildlife viewing and, camping. It was mountain biking that first sparked his interest in photography, which he took up in 2008 at the age of 17. Having such an outdoor oriented background, his focus quickly switched to nature photography. In 2013 Connor was awarded the Eric Hoskins Award in the BBC/Veolia Wildlife Photographer of the Year and was also a speaker at the WildScreen conference (formerly WildPhoto) during the awards week in London. To add to his growing repertoire of skills, Connor has also recently completed a biology degree in ecology and conservation with the hope of becoming a conservation photojournalist. What inspired you to get involved with camera trap work? Before I was even into photography I remember seeing a TV news story about Steve Winter, winning Wildlife Photographer of the Year (WPY) with his snow leopard story. They showed a behind the scenes story about his adventures in central Asia, and that is where I first learned about what a camera trap was. Then after following more of his work, and other photographers like Joe Riis, I was extremely eager to give it a go. I talked to a few people about what to buy, and I finally built my own trap. I then started learning about other great camera trappers like Michael Nichols, Joel Sartore, Paul Colangelo, Sebastian Kennerknecht, and Jonny Armstrong, and was even more inspired to get my trap out in the forest. What do you specifically find are the advantages of using these techniques? I’m sure this answer is the same for everyone, but the biggest advantage is being able to capture images that would be almost impossible to capture if you were standing there. Many species are quite elusive, and even just catching a glimpse of them is an achievement. Camera traps are often the only way to capture close images of these species. Without camera traps, we would know much less about animal behaviour, and many in the general public would be unaware of the conservation issues that these elusive species face. Another advantage is that you do not need to be sitting in a hide for weeks, waiting for your target species to come by. This past winter, by using a camera trap, I was capturing images of bobcats while sitting in a lecture hall writing university exams! What are the disadvantages? The biggest disadvantage I can think of is not knowing when the subject will show...

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BBC Wildlife Camera-Trap Photo of the Year 2014

BBC Wildlife Camera-Trap Photo of the Year 2014

Posted by on Dec 10, 2014 in Blog, News | 0 comments

BBC Wildlife Camera-trap Photographer of the Year is the most prestigious competition of its kind. It is split into two separate overall awards; one for the most sticking photograph and another for the camera-trap image that has done most to advance our understanding of a species. I’m pleased to announce that my image of a black rhino at night won the overall award for most striking photograph as well as the Animals Portraits category. I was also runner-up in the Animal Portraits with my Hippo and Bat photo, and commended in the same category with my Porcupine image. Both of these photographs were taken in South Luangwa National Park in Zambia. All three of these photos were taken using a prototype Camtraptions PIR Motion Sensor. The overall winner of the research categories was this stunning image of an Asiatic cheetah in Iran, taken by the Iranian Cheetah Society. You can view the other images winning and commended images in this gallery. Find out more about the Camtraptions PIR Motion Sensor...

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New Camera Trap Products

Posted by on Dec 3, 2014 in Blog, News | 0 comments

We’re delighted to announce that our eagerly anticipated camera trap products are now ready, and can be ordered from our online store for delivery before Christmas! The first batch of products is limited in quantity, but don’t worry if you miss getting one as more will be arriving towards the end of the month.   PIR Motion Sensor   Our new motion sensors can be used to detect animals and trigger your camera. This is particularly useful when photographing shy or nocturnal wildlife. Our sensor takes the hassle out of camera trap photography; it is very simple to use, quick to set up and reliable. Find out more about it here: PIR Camera Trap Sensor   Camera Housing   When you leave your camera unattended for long periods of time, you will probably want to make sure it is adequately protected from damage and the weather. Our new Camera Housing is the perfect solution! It is a strong metal enclosure that can be disassembled for easy packing. The camera can be conveniently accessed via a lockable hatch at the back. Find out more about it here: Camera Housing   Now available in our new online store!   Both of these new camera trap products are available to buy individually or as a bundle. Visit our new store for...

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